International Relations and Public Policy

What do these various deadlines mean?

Campus Deadline: If an award has a campus deadline, you are required to apply through the MU Fellowships Office. Awards with campus deadlines require that you are endorsed the University of Missouri. Applicants must turn in a complete application to the Fellowship Office the posted campus deadline.

Priority Deadline: If an award has a priority deadline, you are not required to seek the advice of the Fellowships Office on your application although we highly encourage you to do so. The priority deadline is a suggested date for when you should have a well developed application.

Final Deadline: This deadline is the time your completed application is due to the program(s) to which you are applying. We sometimes call this date the “national deadline.” If you do not submit your materials to the program the final deadline, your application will not be considered. Not to fear though. Your fellowships advisor will do everything he or she can to encourage you to submit your application several days prior to a final deadline!

  • Boren Fellowship

    Boren Fellowships provide American graduate students, both at the master’s and the doctoral level, with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation, in exchange for their commitment to seek work in the federal government. The program funds study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin American, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.

  • Boren Scholarship

    Requires campus nomination and must be submitted through the Fellowships Office. Boren Scholarships provide undergraduate and graduate students with the resources and encouragement they need to acquire skills and experiences in areas of the world critical to the future security of our nation, in exchange for their commitment to seek work in the federal government. The program funds study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin American, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.

  • Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program

    The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Summer Enrichment Program is a six-week summer program designed to provide undergraduate students with a deeper appreciation of current issues and trends in international affairs, a greater understanding of career opportunities in international affairs, and the enhanced knowledge and skills to pursue such careers. The Program usually selects 15-20 participants (known as “Rangel Scholars”) each year from universities throughout the United States. Students live at Howard University, attend classes, and participate in a variety of programs with foreign affairs professionals at Howard and at diverse locations around Washington, DC.

  • Chevening Scholarship

    Chevening Scholarships are the UK government’s global scholarship programme, funded by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) and partner organisations. The programme makes awards to outstanding scholars with leadership potential from around the world to study postgraduate courses at UK universities.

  • Fulbright Canada Mitacs Globalink Program

    The Fulbright-MITACS Globalink is intended for US Students interested in coming to Canada to undertake advanced research projects for 10 to 12 weeks (between May and August) in their area of interest. Projects will be drawn from a broad cross-section of research topics covering all academic disciplines and students will be placed with a university research project and undertake research projects under the supervision of a professor. Students will be given the opportunity to take part in professional training and extensive opportunity for cultural, social, and recreational experiences.

  • Fulbright US Student Program

    Fulbright offers recent graduates opportunities for personal and professional development and international experience that fosters mutual understanding among nations through study and research abroad. Students design their own projects, which may include: university coursework, library or field research, classes in a music or art school, independent projects in the social or life sciences, a combination of these or other activities. Students may also apply for the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) program to assistant teach English in one of more than 140 countries.

  • Gates Cambridge Scholarship

    Requires campus nomination and must be submitted through the Fellowships Office. Seeks scholars who will become leaders in helping to address global problems related to health, equity, and technology.  Successful applicants will have the ability to make a significant contribution to their discipline while in Cambridge, with a strong aptitude for research, analysis and a creative approach to defining and solving problems. Awards can be used for full-time residential courses of study including:  research leading to the PhD degree; one year post-graduate courses; second Bachelor degree as an Affiliated Student; MBBChir in Clinical Studies.

  • Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship

    The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship is a competitive national program that provides college graduates the opportunity to work in Washington D.C. with a public-interest organization focusing on international security issues. The fellowship is offered twice yearly, in the spring and fall. It lasts from six to nine months. Scoville Fellows may undertake a variety of activities, including research, writing, and advocacy in support of the goals of their host organization and may attend coalition meetings, policy briefings, and Congressional hearings.

  • Humane Studies Fellowships

    The fellowships support study in fields such as economics, philosophy, law, political science, history, and sociology.

  • James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program

    Requires campus nomination and must be submitted through the Fellowships Office. The James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program provides an opportunity for approximately 12 students who desire careers in international affairs to have a substantive one-year working experience in Washington, D.C. Junior Fellows work as research assistants to scholars working at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.