Minority

What do these various deadlines mean?

Campus Deadline: If an award has a campus deadline, you are required to apply through the MU Fellowships Office. Awards with campus deadlines require that you are endorsed the University of Missouri. Applicants must turn in a complete application to the Fellowship Office the posted campus deadline.

Priority Deadline: If an award has a priority deadline, you are not required to seek the advice of the Fellowships Office on your application although we highly encourage you to do so. The priority deadline is a suggested date for when you should have a well developed application.

Final Deadline: This deadline is the time your completed application is due to the program(s) to which you are applying. We sometimes call this date the “national deadline.” If you do not submit your materials to the program the final deadline, your application will not be considered. Not to fear though. Your fellowships advisor will do everything he or she can to encourage you to submit your application several days prior to a final deadline!

  • American Association for University Women Educational Funding & Awards

    AAUW has a long and distinguished history of advancing educational and professional opportunities for women in the United States and around the globe. One of the world’s largest sources of funding for graduate women, AAUW is providing more than $3.7 million in funding for fellowships and grants to 250 outstanding women and nonprofit organizations in the 2017–18 academic year.

  • Cultural Vistas Fellowship

    The Cultural Vistas Fellowship affords underrepresented U.S. university students the unique opportunity to advance their career goals, develop global competencies, and experience life in another culture. Cultural Vistas will select up to 12 fellows to take part in this multinational professional development program that includes eight-week summer internships in Argentina, Germany, and India.

  • Ford Foundation Fellowship Programs

    Through its fellowship programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students. Predoctoral, dissertation, and postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation.

  • Fulbright US Student Program

    Fulbright offers recent graduates opportunities for personal and professional development and international experience that fosters mutual understanding among nations through study and research abroad. Students design their own projects, which may include: university coursework, library or field research, classes in a music or art school, independent projects in the social or life sciences, a combination of these or other activities. Students may also apply for the Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) program to assistant teach English in one of more than 140 countries.

  • Gilman Scholarship

    This program offers grants for undergraduate students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad. Such international study is intended to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in an increasingly global economy and interdependent world.

  • Humanity in Action

    This intensive summer courses are held in Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Lyon and Warsaw and bring together students from around the world to discuss historical and current human rights issues. The purpose is to create a collaborative environment in which students explore the social and political roots of discrimination and find potential solutions for challenging issues. In addition to lectures and discussions, students visit government agencies, community organizations, nonprofits, and historical sites.

  • National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship

    The National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship program was established in 1989 by direction of congress as an approach to increasing the number of United States (U.S.) citizens receiving doctoral degrees in science and engineering (S&E) disciplines of military importance.

  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRF)

    The National Science Foundation aims to ensure the vitality of research and innovation in the United States by offering approximately 2,000 graduate fellowships in biological science, technology, engineering, mathematics, physical science, earth science and social science. The Graduate Research Fellowship provides three years of support for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees and is intended for students who are at the early stages of their graduate study.

  • National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF REU)

    NSF funds a large number of research opportunities for undergraduate students through its REU Sites program. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel.

  • Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

    Provides opportunities for continuing generations of New Americans to achieve leadership in their chosen fields. A New American is an individual who (1) is a resident alien; i.e., holds a Green Card or, (2) has been naturalized as a U.S. citizen or (3) is the child of two parents who are both naturalized citizens.