Permanent Resident, Page 2

What do these various deadlines mean?

Campus Deadline: If an award has a campus deadline, you are required to apply through the MU Fellowships Office. Awards with campus deadlines require that you are endorsed the University of Missouri. Applicants must turn in a complete application to the Fellowship Office the posted campus deadline.

Priority Deadline: If an award has a priority deadline, you are not required to seek the advice of the Fellowships Office on your application although we highly encourage you to do so. The priority deadline is a suggested date for when you should have a well developed application.

Final Deadline: This deadline is the time your completed application is due to the program(s) to which you are applying. We sometimes call this date the “national deadline.” If you do not submit your materials to the program the final deadline, your application will not be considered. Not to fear though. Your fellowships advisor will do everything he or she can to encourage you to submit your application several days prior to a final deadline!

  • International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF)

    The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship (IDRF) offers nine to twelve months of support to graduate students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled in PhD programs in the United States and conducting dissertation research on non-US topics.

  • James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program

    Requires campus nomination and must be submitted through the Fellowships Office. The James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program provides an opportunity for approximately 12 students who desire careers in international affairs to have a substantive one-year working experience in Washington, D.C. Junior Fellows work as research assistants to scholars working at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  • Knight-Hennessy Scholars

    The Knight-Hennessy Scholars program brings together a multidisciplinary cohort of Stanford graduate students dedicated to finding solutions to the world’s greatest challenges. Scholars may pursue graduate degrees in any of Stanford’s 125+ graduate degree programs.

  • NASA Internships & Fellowships

    NASA Internships are competitive awards to support educational opportunities that provide unique NASA-related research and operational experiences for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students, as well as educators. NASA Fellowships are competitive awards to support independently conceived or designed research, or senior design projects by highly qualified faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students, in disciplines needed to help advance NASA's missions, thus affording them the opportunity to directly contribute to advancements in STEM-related areas of study.

  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (NSF GRF)

    The National Science Foundation aims to ensure the vitality of research and innovation in the United States by offering approximately 2,000 graduate fellowships in biological science, technology, engineering, mathematics, physical science, earth science and social science. The Graduate Research Fellowship provides three years of support for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees and is intended for students who are at the early stages of their graduate study.

  • National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF REU)

    NSF funds a large number of research opportunities for undergraduate students through its REU Sites program. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel.

  • NIH Graduate Partnership Program

    The NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education (OITE) hosts the Graduate Partnerships Program (GPP), which is designed to bring PhD graduate students to the NIH Intramural Research Program for dissertation research. Participants enjoy the academic environment of a university, the extensive research resources of the NIH, and the breadth and depth of the research programs of both the host university and the NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP). The goal is to create a different kind of graduate experience, one that focuses on training the next generation of scientific leaders by emphasizing communication and collaboration skills, integration of information, and interdisciplinary investigation.

  • Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

    Provides opportunities for continuing generations of New Americans to achieve leadership in their chosen fields. A New American is an individual who (1) is a resident alien; i.e., holds a Green Card or, (2) has been naturalized as a U.S. citizen or (3) is the child of two parents who are both naturalized citizens.

  • Rhodes Trust Scholarship

    The Rhodes Scholarship is for U.S. citizens or international students under the age of 24 who are graduating seniors, graduate/professional students, or recent graduates. The Rhodes Scholarship funds graduate study at the University of Oxford in England. The U.S. competition for the Rhodes Scholarship is only open to U.S. citizens, lawful US Permanent Residents, and DACA recipients. There are other award opportunities for international students, including the Rhodes Global Scholarship. The Rhodes Scholarship requires candidates to have an endorsement from the University of Missouri.

  • Rotary Global Grant Scholarships

    Rotary District 6080 offers one Rotary Global Scholarship annually to an outstanding graduate student who wishes to engage in full-time study abroad during the coming academic year. This scholarship is for one year only.